Angels’ Trumpet / Brugmansia & Datura

Brugmansia x candida ‘Pink’ – This Brugmansia aurea x arborea hybrid of garden origin also comes in white, soft yellow and apricot, in single and double forms. The up to 12″ long trumpet flowers are night scented, contrasting nicely against the large, wavy-edged foliage. Many gardeners take summer cuttings to overwinter, rather than keep older specimens. Zone 9 hardy.

Brugmansia arborea (syn. Brugmansia versicolor) The common Angels’ Trumpet bears 6″ long white fragrant blooms from late spring into autumn. Growing an average of 8-10′ tall in temperate gardens, this South American native must be sheltered indoors in all cold-winter regions. All parts of this plant (as well as all Brugmansia and Datura) are poisonous if ingested. Zone 9 hardy.

Brugmansia sanguinea (syn. Datura rosei) – A rare species of Angels’ Trumpet with 6-10″ long tubular flowers with a greenish base, yellowish-orange sides and a vibrant red flare. They are quite beautiful but not fragrant. Growing to about 10′ tall (in cultivation) with coarse wavy-edged foliage, this South American native is found from Colombia down to Chile. Zone 10 hardy.

Datura metel ‘Double Blackcurrant Swirl’ – A true annual (also known as Horn-of-Plenty) that is usually grown from seed, unlike Brugmansia the flowers are upward facing and not pendulous. The double frilled fragrant blooms of this southeast Asian native are white to pale mauve, with dark purple highlights. Growing to 5′ tall, it makes an excellent container specimen. Zone 8 hardy.

Brugmansia ‘Peaches and Cream’ (syn. B. versicolor ‘Peaches and Cream’) – This popular cultivar grows 6 to 8′ tall in cultivation and is a profuse bloomer, with highly fragrant cream flowers that fade to a peach colour. These are nicely contrasted by coarse green foliage that is variegated in creamy-white. Like most Brugmansia, these fast-growing tender shrubs need to be heavily fertilized while they are in growth. Zone 9 hardy.

 

 

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