Annual Vines

Thunbergia alata – Black-Eyed Susan Vine is a common summer flower for obelisks and small trellises. The 1-1.5″ wide blooms come in a range of colours including yellow, orange, golden and white – most with contrasting dark centers. This African native grows to 8′ and flowers summer through to autumn. Grow from small starter plants which are easy to find. Hardy to zone 9-10.

Cobaea scandens – Cup & Saucer Vine features 2″ wide fragrant blooms that open pale green and mature to a purple (a white form, f. alba, is also available). The large cupped flower is surrounded by a ‘saucer’ of bracts at the base, hence the common name. This vigorous plant often reaches heights of 10-12′ in a single season and blooms summer through autumn. Grow from seed. Zone 9-10.

Ipomoea purpurea (syn. Convolvulus purpureus) – Annual Morning Glory Vine should not be confused with the perennial weed Convolvulus arvensis. The trumpet shaped blooms come in quite a range of colours that include pink, magenta, violet-blue and white – most with a contrasting white center. This native of Mexico reaches an average height of 6-10′. Grow from seed.

Tropaeolum speciosum – Flame Nasturtium grows from fleshy  rhizomes that overwinter in sheltered locations or can be lifted and stored like dahlia tubers. It bears prolific vermilion claw-like petaled blooms from summer into fall. Prefers sun on the crown and shaded roots. This RHS 1993 Award of Garden Merit winner also attracts hummingbirds. Grow from starter plants. Hardy to zone 8.

Eccremocarpus scaber – Chilean Glory Vine features tubular orange-red flowers that much attract hummingbirds – other flower colours include coral, pink or yellow. This tender plant from South America is often grown as an annual and prefers part to full sun. Established plants will often reach heights of 10′, but this may vary with seed-grown specimens in colder regions. Hardy to zone 10.

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Vines and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s