Perennial Primula II

Primula x acaulis ‘Primlet’ – A seed strain of double-flowered primulas that come in a variety of colours – including purple, red, yellow, lilac, white and pink. These are fragrant (especially the yellow ones) and much resemble mini-roses when tight in bud, hence the ‘rosebud primrose’ nickname. ‘Primlet’ also work well as temporary houseplants. Grows 6″ high by 8″ wide. Zone 6.

Primula vulgaris BELARINA NECTARINE (syn. ‘Kerbelnec’) – A double English primrose which some might consider as an improvement on ‘Ken Dearman’. BELARINA NECTARINE features fully double golden-yellow flowers with intense peachy-pink highlights from March to May, often with a repeat bloom in autumn. Grows 7″ high by 12″ wide. Zone 5

Primula x polyantha ‘Victoriana Silver Lace Black’ (syn. Primula x elatior) – An heirloom type primrose with unique bright yellow flowers and dark burgundy-brown petals edged in silver. These fragrant blooms are borne in early spring on 2 to 3″ high stems over dense apple-green foliage. Plant in part sun with even soil moisture. Grows 6-8″ high by 6-12″ wide. Zone 5.

Primula vulgaris BELARINA COBALT BLUE (syn. ‘Kerbelcob’) – Another of the the improved double English primroses with deep indigo flowers that are borne from February to April, with a repeat bloom in the fall. These are held over tight clusters of dark green foliage. As with all perennial primroses, divide every 3 years for the best vigor. Grows 7″ high by 12″ wide. Zone 5.

Primula x pruhoniciana ‘Wanda Mix’ (syn. Primula x juliae) – These have much the same growing habit as the original deep purple ‘Wanda’ but come in an array of colours – including yellow, red, burgundy, pink, blue, white and salmon. They prefer part shade and are ideal for edging an open woodland garden due to their low, spreading nature. Grows 4-6″ high to 12″ wide. Zone 5.

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One Response to Perennial Primula II

  1. Barb Roberts says:

    where can I purchase perennial primulas such as those pictured above?

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