Shrubs with Coloured Foliage

spirdoubleplaygold (300x296)Spiraea japonica DOUBLE PLAY GOLD (syn. ‘Yan’) – A Proven Winners deciduous shrub with bright yellow new growth (that matures to gold) that is mildew resistant. It bears rich rose-pink flower clusters from May to July that are highly attractive to butterflies. DOUBLE PLAY GOLD has a compact rounded growth habit. Grows 16-24″ high by 24″ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

hyalburypurple (300x292)Hypericum androsaemum ‘Albury Purple’ (syn. ‘Tedbury Purple’) – This is a clumping deciduous shrub (not an invasive groundcover like the other Hypericum) with outer leaves (up to 4″ long) that are tinted a rich plum-purple and nicely contrast the June to August yellow flower clusters. These are followed by red (maturing to black) berries. Grows 18-36″ high and wide. Z5.

philadelphusgold (300x288)Philadelphus coronarius ‘Aureus’ (syn. P. caucasicus ‘Aureus’) – This Golden Mockorange is an RHS Award of Garden Merit winner and features new growth of chartreuse that matures to lime green. The foliage is nicely complimented by highly fragrant pure white single blooms in early summer. Prefers fertile, well drained soil. Grows 5-8′ high and wide. Hardy to zone 4.

sambucusblacklace (300x293)Sambucus nigra BLACK LACE (syn. ‘Eva’) – The finely cut purplish-black foliage of this European Elderberry is reminiscent of coarse weeping Japanese maple leaves. The pale pink flower clusters (borne from June to July) nicely compliment the foliage and are followed by edible black berries that are often used for jam or wine. Grows 6 to 8′ high and wide. Hardy to zone 4.

wegrubidor (294x300)Weigela florida ‘Rubidor’ (syn. ‘Briant Rubidor’, ‘Olympiade’) – This deciduous shrub is a sport of ‘Bristol Ruby’ with bright chartreuse foliage that darkens slightly with age. It bears clusters of trumpet-shaped ruby-red flowers from June to July, often with a repeat bloom in late summer. It prefers part to full sun and attracts hummingbirds. Grows 5-7′ high by 4-6′ wide. Zone 5.

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