Woodland Perennials III

tiarellaspanishcross (300x295)Tiarella ‘Spanish Cross’ – A semi-evergreen perennial (in mild regions) with deeply lobed dark green leaves that are beautifully marked with inset burgundy-black markings, with the foliage shifting to a deep bronze-purple in winter. Pale pink to near white starry blooms are borne on short stems just over the crown in late spring. Grows 8-10″ high by 10-12″ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

epimediumroseum (300x286)Epimedium x youngianum ‘Roseum’ – This cultivar of Bishop’s Hat has newly emerging foliage of bright green to chartreuse (often with a bronze tinge) and pale lilac-pink blooms in mid spring. It is thought to be a natural hybrid between E. diphyllum and E. grandiflorum and is drought tolerant once established. Grows 8 to 10″ high by 12 to 18″ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

heucherellasweettea (281x300)x Heucherella ‘Sweet Tea’ – This Heuchera villosa and Tiarella bi-generic hybrid features huge (up to 4″ across) maple-like leaves that emerge with strong hues of orange and amber (with deep red veining) and darken in summer to tones of cinnamon, copper and russet. Small white flowers are borne on red stems in late spring. Semi-evergreen. Grows 20″ high by 24-28″ wide. Zone 4.

disporumcantoniense (300x289)Disporum cantoniense – A native of China and southeast Asia, this elegant perennial has the look of bamboo at a distance and features variable bell-shaped blooms of reddish-brown, pale yellow (shown), dark purple or creamy white borne from late spring to early summer – followed by purplish-black berries. Grows 36″ high by 12″ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

ferngymno (300x292)Gymnocarpium dryopteris – Oak Fern is a native of coastal British Columbia (and many other parts of the world) and it forms a dense groundcover that allows taller woodlanders (Bleeding Heart, Solomon’s Seal) to grow above. The triangular fronds emerge a bright lime green and darken as they mature, often giving a two-toned effect. 8″ high, indefinite spread. Zone 4.

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