Yarrow / Achillea

achilleapomegranate (300x281)Achillea millefolium ‘Pomegranate’ – The June to September blooms of ‘Pomegranate’ are a beautiful magenta-red and nicely contrasted by the fern-like green foliage. It is part of the TUTTI FRUTTI Series out of the Netherlands and was initially discovered in a clump of Achillea ‘Summer Pastels’. Faded blooms can be used in dried arrangements. Grows 25-28″ high. Zone 4.

achilleamoonshine (300x291)Achillea x ‘Moonshine’ – This RHS Award of Garden Merit winner blooms from June to September with a cheerful display of bright yellow flower clusters. These are nicely complimented by the fine-textured silver-grey foliage. This cross of A. clypeolata and A. ‘Taygetea’ was bred by Alan Bloom. Grows 18 to 24″ high by 12  to 24″ wide. Hardy to zone 3.

achilleantuttifrutti (293x300)Achillea ‘Pink Grapefruit’ – This Dutch introduction is part of the TUTTI FRUTTI Series which are more compact in nature. It bears lavender-pink domed flower clusters (in June and July) that fade as they age, often giving a bicolor appearance. This Yarrow is a good low maintenance choice for containers and it is deer resistant. Grows 26″ high and wide. Hardy to zone 4.

achilleaterracotta (300x294)Achillea millefolium ‘Terracotta’ – The flowers of this Yarrow cultivar are constantly changing, starting out salmon, fading to a peachy-orange and then a pastel yellow. These colours often show all at once and contrast nicely against the finely cut grey-green foliage. As with all Yarrows, this Achillea will attract butterflies. Grows 30-36″ high by 24-30″ wide. Hardy to zone 3.

achilleared (294x300)Achillea millefolium ‘Paprika’ – An older variety that remains quite popular much in part to its cherry-red flowers (with distinct contrasting yellow eye) that fade to a soft pink, and finally a pale yellow – these are borne over fine green foliage. Deadhead the spent blooms in order to prolong the flower display. Drought tolerant. Grows 18-24″ high and wide. Hardy to zone 3.

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