Winter Heather V / Erica

ericatatanya (300x287)Erica carnea ‘Tatjana’ – A compact growing winter heather with deep magenta-red blooms from February through to April. The flowers are nicely contrasted by dark green needle-like foliage that takes on a bronze tone in the colder winter weather. Prefers part to full sun and will need the spent blooms lightly trimmed after flowering. Grows 6″ high by 14″ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

ericacanaliculata (300x290)Erica canaliculata  – A tree heather native to South Africa and an RHS Award of Garden Merit winner. It smothers itself in white to pale pink cup-shaped blooms (with contrasting dark brown anthers) from January to May over medium green foliage. Best grown in a large container (can be trained as a standard) and overwintered in a cool greenhouse. Grows 5-6′ high by 3′. Z9-10

ericaevagold (298x300)Erica x darleyensis ‘Eva Gold’ (syn. ‘Eva’s Gold’) (Erica carnea x E. erigena) – A sport of the highly regarded ‘Kramer’s Red’ (‘Kramer’s Rote’) that was discovered in France. It features bright magenta flowers from January to April. The foliage emerges lime green, shifting to a golden yellow by summer, with some gold highlights left for winter. Grows 12″ high by 18″ wide. Zone 6.

ericaschneekuppe (300x295)Erica carnea ‘Schneekoppe’ (syn. ‘Schneekuppe’) – This low-growing cultivar is considered to be an improved ‘Springwood White’. It bears masses of pure white urn-shaped flowers from January to March over bright green foliage. A good choice for a tall groundcover if planted densely enough. Prefers evenly moist, well-drained acidic soils. Grows 6″ high by 12-18″ wide. Zone 5.

ericatatania (300x292)Erica carnea ‘Tanja’ –  Another compact growing winter heather with deep rose blooms over a long period of time, from February through to April. These are nicely contrasted by dark green foliage that takes on a bronze hue during winter. As with all Erica x darleyensis and carnea, they should be lightly sheared after flowering. Grows 6″ high by 14″ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

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