Alpine Perennials IV

alpdrababrunifolia (298x300)Draba brunifolia – Whitlow Grass is a dwarf evergreen alpine perennial which forms a dense mound of green, almost moss-like rosettes. It bears bright yellow flowers on short stems just above the foliage from March to April. Draba brunifolia prefers nutrient poor, well-drained soils in full sun and is a good choice for alpine troughs. Grows 2-3″ high by 4-6″ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

aubaccentvioletweye (300x275)Aubrieta AXCENT ‘Violet with Eye’ (syn. ‘Audelvioe’) – A striking Rock Cress cultivar with rich violet-purple flowers accented with a white-edged yellow eye, blooming over spreading evergreen foliage. It should be lightly pruned after flowering to keep the plant looking tidy. A good choice to trail over rock walls in full sun exposures. Grows 4″ high by 12-18″ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

alprhodanthemumnosmariense (300x294)Rhodanthemum hosmariense (syn. Chrysanthemum hosmariense, Leucanthemum hosmariense) – This RHS Award of Garden Merit winner bears white daisy blooms (up to 2″ wide with yellow centers) on short stems from spring into autumn. These are nicely contrasted by the finely cut silvery-grey foliage. Requires sharp drainage. Grows 4-12″ high by 12-20″. Zone 5.

camapnulagetmee (300x295)Campanula portenschlagiana GET MEE – A newer Dalmatian Bellflower cultivar that works well as a groundcover, or in containers and window boxes. It bears abundant upward facing violet-blue bell-shaped flowers that repeat bloom from June to September. This herbaceous perennial prefers part to full sun with good drainage. Grows 4-6″ high by 20″ wide. Zone 4.

saxifraga (300x289)Saxifraga x arendsii ‘Purple Robe’ – Despite the cultivar name, this Mossy Saxifrage produces numerous carmine-red blooms (in spring) over moss-like evergreen foliage. Unlike many other alpine plants, it prefers even soil moisture with a part sun exposure, as it dislikes extreme heat – and it can also be grown from seed. Grows 6 to 8″ high by 10 to 12″ wide. Zone 4.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Gardening and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s