Alpine Perennials V

aubneuling (299x300)Aubrieta x cultorum ‘Neuling’ (syn. ‘Newbie’, ‘Newcomer’) – A softer tone of Rock Cress is a welcome change and ‘Neuling’ fits the bill with pale lavender-blue flowers (with a white eye) borne from April to May over dense grey-green foliage that is semi-evergreen. This perennial prefers full sun with well drained soil. Grows 4-5″ high by  1-2′ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

phloxpaparbrightpink (300x293)Phlox x PAPARAZZI BRIGHT PINK (syn. ‘Britney’) – A new hybrid low-growing Phlox that much resembles subulata but adapts to partial shade. PAPARAZZI BRIGHT PINK bears large screaming pink flowers (with small white eyes) from April to May that are also fragrant. Shear back after flowering to keep the plant in good form. Grows 8-10″ high by 18″ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

iberissaxatilis (300x285)Iberis saxatilis – This species of Candytuft is an evergreen perennial or sub-shrub that is native to Greece, Romania, Spain, France and Italy. It bears 1.5″ wide rounded white (occasionally fading to pale lilac) flower clusters in spring over very dark green foliage. Like most Candytuft, it prefers full sun and well-drained soils. Grows 6″ high by 12″ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

anemonepaga (300x292)Pulsatilla vulgaris sub. grandis ‘Papageno’ (formerly Anemone pulsatilla) – This strain of Pasque Flower features variable colours (white, purple, soft pink, lilac, ruby red) of single, semi-double and double blooms with fringed petals. It blooms from March to April over grey-green fern-like foliage. Prefers fertile soils and full sun. Grows 6 to 12″ high by 8 to 10″ wide. Hardy to zone 3.

phloxpaparazzisoftlav (300x295)Phlox x PAPARAZZI SOFT LAVENDER (syn. ‘Gaga’) – PAPARAZZI is a new class of hybrid Phlox bred from P. subulata and P. divaricata, which is a woodland species. The result is partial shade (to full sun) tolerant low growing group with fragrant flowers. ‘Gaga’ bears soft lavender-pink blooms from April to May. Grows 8-10″ high by 18″ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

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