Woodland Perennials VI

brunneragreengold (300x290)Brunnera macrophylla ‘Green Gold’ – I find that this cultivar of Siberian Bugloss has more lime green than golden foliage – but it is still bright enough to catch the eye in a shaded corner. It bears pale blue Forget-Me-Not flowers starting in mid spring. ‘Green Gold’ is sun tolerant (with even soil moisture) in coastal BC. Grows 8 to 12″ high by 20 to 24″ wide. Hardy to zone 3.

erycitrinum (300x288)Erythronium citrinum – The Cream or Citrus Fawn Lily is native to a small region of California and Oregon. It thrives in open shade or part sun and bears recurved cream to pale yellow blooms (with an orange center) that are fragrant. The coarse basal leaves are a mottled blend of green and burgundy-brown. Rare in cultivation. Grows 6-8″ high by 8-12″ wide. Hardy to zone 6.

hacquetiaepi (300x295)Hacquetia epipactis (syn. Dondia epipactis) – This partial shade lover is found in a single species genus that is native to Europe. It bears unusual bright yellow flowers that are surrounded by lime green bracts that emerge from March to April. Hacquetia forms a small rounded dome and is an RHS Award of Garden Merit winner. Grows 6″ high by 6-12″ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

epimediumgrandiflorum (296x300)Epimedium grandiflorum – This species of Barrenwort or Bishop’s Hat is native to Japan, Korea and China. It is an RHS Award of Garden Merit winner with variable mid to late spring pendent blooms of white, pink, yellow or purple/white (shown).  The pale green foliage is spiny-margined and often tinted bronze when flushing. Grows 8-12″ high by 12-16″ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

anemonevestal (296x300)Anemone nemorosa ‘Vestal’ – A highly sought-after cultivar of Wood Anemone with pure white blooms of six separated ray petals surrounding a ruffled central pompom. This RHS Award of Garden Merit winner flowers late March to early May and often goes summer dormant. ‘Vestal’ is a great addition to any ‘Alba’ woodland garden. Grows 4″ high by 12″+ wide. Zone 4.

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