Bergenia II / Pigsqueak

bergbressinghamruby (293x300)Bergenia ‘Bressingham Ruby’ – This cultivar from Blooms of Bressingham features compact stems of rich magenta-pink flowers from mid to late spring. These are borne over glossy evergreen foliage that often takes on reddish-bronze highlights during colder weather. The blooms are good cut flowers and it makes a fine groundcover. Grows 14″ high by 12-18″ wide. Hardy to zone 3.

bergciliata (300x299)Bergenia ciliata – This species of Bergenia is native to India and the Himalayas. It produces light pink blooms (that darken as they age) from early to mid spring. The hairy green rounded foliage is not reliably evergreen and should be considered herbaceous. It thrives in part shade exposures with even soil moisture. Grows 12″ high by 18″ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

bergpurpurascens (293x300)Bergenia purpurascens (syn. Bergenia beesiana) – Another Bergenia native to the Himalayas, as well as Burma (Myanmar) and China. It is an RHS Award of Garden Merit winner and features deep pink flowers borne on reddish stems in mid spring. The foliage is reliably evergreen and often shifts to a rich red in the colder winter weather. Grows 12-18″ high by 12-24″. Zone 3.

bergsilherlicht (292x300)Bergenia ‘Silberlicht’ (syn. ‘Silverlight’) – Another RHS Award of Garden Merit winner with silvery-white flowers (borne on red stems) that fade to a light pink, blooming from April to May. These are produced over coarse mid green leaves (6-8″ long) with scalloped edges that shift to a maroon-purple in autumn. Deadhead the spent blooms. Grows 12-18″ high by 12-24″. Z4.

bergeroica (300x285)Bergenia ‘Eroica’ – This hybrid Bergenia features bright magenta-purple blooms held on beautiful red stems from April to May. The evergreen foliage of this AGM winner often turns burgundy in winter. Divide every 3 to 5 years in spring or early fall when the vigor appears to be lacking. ‘Eroica’ makes a striking container specimen. Grows 12-14″ high by 16-20″ wide. Zone 4.

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