Pink-Flowered Rhododendrons II

rhodohelenchild (291x300)Rhododendron ‘Helen Child’ – This hard to find Rhododendron was bred by H.L. Larson of Tacoma Washington and features funnel-shaped bright pink flowers borne in April that are lighter or near white in the center. The dark green leaves are nicely rounded and form a dense mounding canopy. Best grown in morning sun, with afternoon shade. Grows 3′ high and wide. Zone 6.

rhodomaureen (300x295)Rhododendron ‘Maureen’ (R. williamsianum x ‘Lem’s Goal’) – A floriferous Rhododendron with abundant pale pink bell-shaped blooms from late April into May. The new leaves emerge with a distinct coppery tinge as is common with Rhododendrons bred from R. williamsianum. This hybrid was developed by Lem Halfdan of Seattle. Grows 3-4′ high by 4′ wide. Hardy to zone 6.

rhodooudijk'ssensation (294x300)Rhododendron ‘Oudijk’s Sensation’ (‘Essex Scarlet’ x R. williamsianum) – A German hybrid (Hobbie) which bears bright rose frilled flowers with darker spotting and edging – usually emerging April through to early May. The shrub forms a mounded crown of deep green rounded leaves, although these emerge with a coppery tinge. Grows 4-6′ high by 5-6′ wide. Hardy to zone 6.

rhodomissionbellsb (300x286)Rhododendron ‘Mission Bells’ (R. williamsianum x R. orbiculare) – An older Rhododendron introduction (circa 1940) that has remained quite popular over the years. It produces beautiful bell-shaped pale pink to near white flowers held in lax pendulous trusses. These are nicely contrasted by the rounded green foliage that forms a dense crown. Grows 4′ high by 5′ wide. Zone 6.

rhodohallelujah (300x290)Rhododendron ‘Hallelujah’ (‘Jean Marie de Montague’ x ‘Kimberly’) – A bold Rhododendron that lives up to its name with large trusses of a rich rose-pink, with individual flowers up to 4″ across. Bred by Harold Greer of Eugene Oregon, it also has dense grey-green foliage. Best grown in partial sun or a filtered light exposure. Grows 4′ high by 4-6′ wide. Hardy to zone 6.

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