A Fern Sampler II

fernpolytsussimense (300x289)Polystichum tsus-simense (syn. P. tsussimense) The Korean Rock Fern is an RHS Award of Garden Merit winner with glossy evergreen fronds that emerge a lime and mature to a deep green. The stems and leaflet midribs are darker in colour, giving it an intricate appearance. Tolerates morning or late evening sun in coastal BC. Grows 12-16″ high by 12-18″ wide. Zone 6.

cyrtomiumfortunei (289x300)Cyrtomium fortunei – The Japanese Holly Fern is a reliably evergreen species (where hardy) that prefers a higher pH, making it easy to grow near cement sidewalks or patios. It is an RHS Award of Garden Merit winner which has lance-shaped pinnae with fronds that emerge lime (as shown) and mature to a mat green. Grows 2′ high by 18″ wide. Hardy to zone 7.

drylinearispoly (2) (284x300)Dryopteris filix-mas ‘Linearis Polydactyla’ – The Many-Fingered Male Fern lives up to its common name with thin, often overlapping mid green pinnae, giving it a lacy textured appearance. Despite its delicate looks, it is actually quite an easy cultivar to grow. Semi-evergreen in coastal BC but completely herbaceous in colder climates. Grows 3-4′ high by 2-3′ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

osmundaregalispur (295x300)Osmunda regalis ‘Purpurascens’ – This cultivar of Royal Fern bears purple-tinted stems, as well as some coloration on the newly emerging fronds. Like the species it is herbaceous and produces spores in brown tip clusters. The rounded pinnae are quite separated, giving it a unique appearance. Tolerant of moist to wet soils. Grows 3-5′ high by 2-3′ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

thelypterispalustris (300x299)Thelypteris palustris – The Marsh Fern is a herbaceous species native to eastern North America, as well as Europe and Asia. It spreads by creeping rhizomes and is found in marshes and by river sides, where it tolerates full sun with even soil moisture. This species has pale green sterile and fertile fronds (rounded edges on fertile fronds). Grows 24″ high by 3′ wide. Zone 5.

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