Deciduous Azaleas III

azmtsainthelens (300x283)Rhododendron x ‘Mount Saint Helens’ (Girard Hybrid) – Large balled trusses of fragrant bright pink flowers (about 2.5″ across) with an orange flare emerge from red buds. This cross of R. ‘Cecile’ and an unnamed Knaphill azalea is easy to grow and flowers from May to June. Best grown in full sun. Features purplish autumn tones. Grows 5-7′ high. Hardy to zone 4.

azdaviesii (295x300)Rhododendron x ‘Daviesii’ (Ghent Hybrid) – A sweetly fragrant deciduous azalea with creamy-white blooms with contrasting yellow spotting emerging from pink-tinted buds. It is an RHS Award of Garden Merit winner and a cross of Rhododendron viscosum and R. molle. ‘Daviesii’ is a bit shorter in stature than most deciduous azaleas. Grows 4-5′ high. Hardy to zone 5.

azantilope (300x292)Rhododendron x ‘Antilope’ (syn. ‘Antelope’) (Viscosum Hybrid) – This cross of Rhododendron viscosum and Azalea ‘Koster’s Brilliant Red’ produced a late blooming (May to June) deciduous azalea with sweetly fragrant salmon-pink flowers accented with a hint of yellow. It is a 2012 RHS Award of Garden Merit winner that was bred back in 1938. Grows 4-6′ high. Hardy to zone 5.

azchetco (293x300)Rhododendron x ‘Chetco’ (Knaphill Type Hybrid) – A cross of ‘Hugh Wormald’ and ‘Marion Merriman’ that produces large (3.5″ wide) bright yellow blooms accented with an orange blotch – these appear from late May into June. It has an upright, spreading growth habit and features burgundy-red autumn foliar tones. Part to full sun exposure. Grows 5-6′ high. Hardy to zone 5.

azbalsac (300x292)Rhododendron x ‘Balzac’ (Exbury Hybrid) – Deep reddish-orange (with a darker orange flash) elegantly tapered blooms emerge from red buds in May and are borne at the ends of the branches. It is an older cultivar (circa 1934) that was bred bred by Lionel de Rothschild and also features deep red autumn tones. It has a spreading growth habit at maturity. Grows 6-7′ high. Zone 5.

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