Peppers III / Capsicum

pepperjalapeno1 (300x295)Capsicum annuum ‘Jalapeno’ – These small to medium sized (averaging 2″ long) chili peppers are often picked green, but will mature to red if left to ripen, at which point they have a sweeter flavour. If you don’t like the heat when cooking, you can always just remove the seeds. The plants are generally quite productive. Grows 24″ high. Ripens in 75 days.

peppersweetbanana (300x292)Capsicum annuum ‘Sweet Banana’ – These are great all-around peppers which are commonly pickled and used on sandwiches, chopped up in a relish or used fresh in salads. The thick-walled sweet peppers are mild and grow 4-6″ long with a taper – often with a slight curve. They will ripen to red and the plants work well in containers. Grows 18-24″ high. Ripens in 70-75 days.

pepperhotkungpao (296x300)Capsicum annuum ‘Kung Pao’ – These long, skinny peppers somewhat resemble Cayenne but are only mildly hot. They grow 4-6″ long on average and are green, ripening to a deep red. The plant is vigorous, easy to grow and quite productive. ‘Kung Pao’ is often used in Thai cooking and its thin walls make them ideal for drying. Grows 24-36″ high. Ripens in 85 days.

pepperbasketofire (289x300)Capsicum frutescens ‘Basket of Fire’ – A little pepper that lives up to its name with hot fruits measuring 80,000 SHU (Scoville heat units). It is a good choice for growing in containers or hanging baskets, as the plant has a slightly trailing habit. The 2-3″ long peppers go from creamy yellow, to orange, and finally red when ripe. Grows 12″ high by 20″ wide. Ripens in 90 days.

peppercayennetta (300x291)Capsicum annuum ‘Cayennetta’ – This 2012 AAS winner is an F1 hybrid with 3-4″ long tapered fruits with a slightly spicy flavour. The upright plants are well-branched and the dense foliage protects the fruits from sun scorch. It grows well in containers and also tolerates cooler temperatures. The peppers emerge green and ripen to bright red. Grows 24-30″ high. Ripens in 69 days.

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