Tall Stonecrops II / Sedum (Hylotelephium)

sedumgarnetbrocade (300x288)Sedum x GARNET BROCADE (syn. ‘Garbro’) – This Proven Winners selection starts with deep green foliage that shifts to burgundy (with darker stems) later in the season. It flowers from August to October with clusters of pink buds opening to bright rose blooms. GARNET BROCADE is drought tolerant once established. Grows 16-18″ high by 14-18″ wide. Zone 3.

sedumautumnjoy (300x300)Sedum x ‘Autumn Joy’ (syn. ‘Herbstfreude’) – This Stonecrop has long been a landscape standard, much in part for its dependable late summer to fall display of dusty-pink flower clusters that fade with bronze highlights. If you find that they get too leggy, try pinching them when the new growth reaches about 6-8″ high. Grows 24″ high by 18-24″ wide. Hardy to zone 3.

sedumxenox (300x284)Sedum telephium ‘Xenox’ – A newer compact Sedum that works well in containers, with scalloped foliage of green (with rose highlights) that deepens to a rich burgundy by midsummer. The 2-3″ wide flower clusters are numerous, with deep ruby-red buds opening to rose-pink flowers in late summer. Attracts butterflies. Grows 18″ high by 18-20″ wide. Hardy to zone 3.

sedummrgoodbud (300x293)Sedum x ‘Mr. Goodbud’ – This Stonecrop is a hybrid of Sedum spectabile ‘Brilliant’ and features large broccoli-like clusters of bright purplish-pink flowers in late summer. It was a 2006 RHS Award of Garden Merit winner and has shorter, stronger stems that don’t require staking. Dormant seed heads can be left for the birds in winter. Grows 16″ high by 18-20″ wide. Zone 3.

sedumblackjack (300x300)Sedum ‘Black Jack’ – This sport of ‘Matrona’ was a bronze medal winner at Plantarium 2005 and has some of the darkest purple foliage of any of the tall Stonecrops. The flower clusters can open up to 8″ wide and are an attractive light pink. It was discovered at Walters Gardens of Michigan and prefers well-drained soils and full sun. Grows 24″ high by 18-24″ wide. Hardy to zone 3.

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