Blueberries with Fall Colour

blueduke4 (300x293)Vaccinium corymbosum ‘Duke’ – An RHS Award of Garden Merit winner often with yellow to orange (red shown) autumn tones. One of the best highbush blueberries for fresh eating due to its superior (ever so slightly tart) flavour. In coastal BC prune in late February, removing dead and some old wood to allow for rejuvenation. Ripens early season. 4-6′ high by 4-5′. Zone 4.

bluehardyblue (293x300)Vaccinium corymbosum ‘Hardyblue’ (syn. ‘Hardy Blue’, ‘1613-A’) – An old, reliable highbush blueberry cultivar that bears medium sized berries that are quite sweet, perfect for cooking with. It tolerates heavier clay soils and is resistant to scorch virus. The dark green foliage shifts to bright red in the fall. Red winter stems. Ripens midseason. Grows 4-6′ high and wide. Hardy to zone 4.

bluechippewa (300x298)Vaccinium x ‘Chippewa’ – One of the half-high blueberries introduced in 1996 by the University of Minnesota. It is a cross of highbush and lowbush (Vaccinium angustifolium) blueberries that produces sweet, medium sized berries with light blue skin. Autumn foliage varies from yellow to orange and red to purple. Ripens midseason. Grows 3-4′ high and wide. Zone 3.

bluenorthland (300x290)Vaccinium x ‘Northland’ – This half-high blueberry introduced by the University of Michigan is self-fertile and produces smaller berries with excellent flavour. The branches flex well and do not break under snow loads, as this cultivar was bred to withstand sub-zero temperatures. Yellowish-orange, red or purplish fall tones. Ripens midseason. Grows 4′ high by 4-5′ wide. Z3.

bluenorthcountry (291x300)Vaccinium x ‘Northcountry’ – Another of the hybrid half-high blueberries that was bred for use in colder regions. It is a prolific producer of small to medium-sized fruits with an excellent wild blueberry flavour. The glossy deep green foliage shifts to a fiery scarlet in autumn. Ripens early to midseason. Grows about 2 feet high by 3 feet wide. Hardy to zone 3.

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