Spring-Tips Scotch Heather III / Calluna vulgaris

calleslieslinger (300x296)Calluna vulgaris ‘Leslie Slinger’ – A very showy spring-tips Scotch heather with coral-pink to reddish-orange new growth over contrasting mid green foliage. ‘Leslie Slinger’ produces lavender flowers in late summer, usually from August into September. This species prefers full sun with good soil drainage. Attracts. Grows 8-12″ high by 14-20″ wide. Zone 5.

calzeta (297x300)Calluna vulgaris ‘Zeta’ – This cultivar of Scotch heather is primarily a foliage plant whose new growth is an iridescent lemon yellow. It is particularly effective when used as an accent with green-needled forms of Calluna vulgaris. ‘Zeta’ is a part of the Garden Girls bud bloomer series even though it produces no flower buds. Grows 12″ high by 16″ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

calkerstin (300x296)Calluna vulgaris ‘Kerstin’ – An RHS Award of Garden Merit winner with excellent hardiness that originates from Sweden. ‘Kerstin’ features reddish and soft yellow new growth tips that nicely compliment the downy greyish-green winter foliage. It produces spikes of soft mauve flowers from August through to September. Grows 12″ high by 18″ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

callemonqueen (300x298)Calluna vulgaris ‘Lemon Queen’ – A blooming form of Scotch heather which can be used much like ‘Zeta’ for its lovely lemon yellow foliage, but with the benefits of flowers. ‘Lemon Queen’ is somewhat prone to sunburn in hot exposed sites, so consider a part sun exposure for this cultivar. It produces pale lavender to white blooms in late summer. Grows 12″ high by 18″ wide. Z5.

calrubyslinger (294x300)Calluna vulgaris ‘Ruby Slinger’ – Named after the wife of plantsman Leslie Slinger, this cultivar produces sulfur yellow new needles that shifts to lime green. It has a spiky, mounded growth habit and prefers acidic soils. The pure white flowers which are borne from August to October nicely compliment the mature deep green foliage. Grows 10-12″ high by 18-24″ wide. Zone 5.

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