Japanese Maples / Acer palmatum & shirasawanum

acercoonarapygmy (300x295)Acer palmatum ‘Coonara Pygmy’ – A ‘witches broom’ selection from Australia with a dense growth habit, making it a good bonsai specimen. This cultivar flushes with pink highlights on green foliage, shifting to green in summer and a brilliant reddish-orange in autumn. ‘Coonara Pygmy’ makes an excellent container plant. Grows 4-5′ high and wide. Hardy to zone 5.

acerbaldsmith (300x290)Acer palmatum var. dissectum ‘Baldsmith’ – An ever-changing weeping Japanese maple with leaves emerging reddish-orange in spring and then shifting to green with crisp red margins. It eventually fades to green but makes up for this with vibrant yellows and oranges in the fall. A great choice for those who appreciate seasonal colour. Grows 4-6′ high by 6-8′. Zone 6.

acerhuppsdwarf (300x296)Acer palmatum ‘Hupp’s Dwarf ‘ – A very dense growing upright form with tiny green leaves that emerge pink-tinted and mature to a deep green. It is an excellent bonsai or container specimen, particularly with its red to orange autumn foliage. This variety also works well in miniature or fairy gardens. Rare in cultivation. Grows 2-3’ high by 18-36″ wide in 10 years. Zone 5.

acerautumnmoon (300x292)Acer shirasawanum ‘Autumn Moon’ – This chance seedling was a J.D. Vertrees find and features broad golden leaves that unfurl with salmon-pink to reddish-orange highlights that are more pronounced with some sun. In regions with hot summers, it should be planted with afternoon shade. Reddish-orange autumn tones. Grows 15′ high by 18′ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

aceremeraldlace (300x293)Acer palmatum var. dissectum ‘Emerald Lace’ – A fast growing weeping Japanese maple with finely cut green foliage which emerges with red highlights and shifts to a bold purplish-red in the fall. ‘Emerald Lace’ tolerates full sun in coastal BC and is an RHS Award of Garden Merit winner. It has a rounded, pendulous growth habit. Grows 4-6′ tall by 7-8′ wide in 10 yrs. Zone 6.

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