Clematis VII

clemfloridasieboldii (300x287)Clematis florida ‘Sieboldii’ (syn. var. sieboldiana) – A rather tender Clematis with spectacular white flowers (usually tinged green at the petal tip) accented with a bold purple stamen boss, followed by fluffy seedheads in the fall. It blooms continually from June to September and prefers some shelter from cold winds. Grows 6-8′ high. Pruning group C. Hardy to zone 7.

clemspecialoccasion (300x285)Clematis ‘Special Occasion’ (Pyne 1995) – A good choice for growing in containers or using in smaller urban gardens, ‘Special Occasion’ features pale lavender-pink blooms with a slighter lighter bar and pronounced ribbing, nicely complimented by reddish-purple tipped yellow stamens. Blooms late spring into summer, and September. Grows 6-8′. Pruning group B. Zone 4.

clemannalouise (296x300)Clematis ‘Anna Louise’ (syn. ‘Evithree’) (Evison 1990) – This RHS Award of Garden Merit winner is named after Raymond Evison’s daughter. It features single blooms in May, June and September (with the first flush being larger) that are an intense violet with a reddish-purple bar and contrasting yellow stamens. Very free-flowering. Grows 6-8′. Pruning group B. Hardy to zone 4.

clemcottoncandy (300x299)Clematis VANCOUVER ‘Cotton Candy’ (Clearview 2013) – This Clearview introduction hails from British Columbia and features 6-8″ wide white blossoms with a pale raspberry-pink bar and complimenting yellow stamens. These are borne in May, June and again in September. ‘Cotton Candy’ is also short enough to be used in a large container. Grows 6-9′. Pruning group B. Zone 4.

clemdiam (300x295)Clematis ‘DIAMANTINA’ (syn. ‘Evipo039′) (Evison/Poulsen 2010) – A beautiful double-flowered Clematis which was bred for container culture. DIAMANTINA features fully double 4-6″ wide purplish-blue blossoms from May to June and repeats in September. It looks stunning when trained onto a wrought iron obelisk. Grows 7’ tall. Pruning group B. Hardy to zone 4.

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