Echinacea IV / Coneflower

echinacearaspberrytart (300x293)Echinacea ‘Raspberry Tart’ – This Purple Coneflower features smaller raspberry-pink blooms that are fragrant, accented with a maroon-red central cone. It flowers from midsummer through to fall with regular deadheading and will definitely attract the butterflies. This compact cultivar prefers full sun and good soil drainage. Grows 18-24″ high by 18″ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

echinaceabigskyharvest (300x284)Echinacea ‘Harvest Moon’ (syn. ‘Matthew Saul’) – This member of the BIG SKY Series from Itsaul Nurseries of Georgia features pendulous petals of a deep golden yellow with an orange cone. It is a cross of Echinacea paradoxa and E. purpurea which features some fragrance. They also make excellent cut flowers for the vase. Grows 24-30″ high by 18″ wide. Hardy to zone 4.

echguavaice (300x290)Echinacea ‘Guava Ice’ – A full double Echinacea with huge cones of guava-orange and pendulous pinkish-orange petals that fade to pink. They can grow as large as 4″ across and are a part of the Cone-fections Collection from the Netherlands. The blooms are held high on the plant on thick lime green stems from late June to September. Grows 24-30″ high by 24-36″ wide. Zone 5.

echinaceasummersky (300x287)Echinacea ‘Summer Sky’ (syn. ‘Katie Saul’) – Unusual peachy-orange to salmon petals surround a prominent brownish-orange cone on this member of the BIG SKY series from Georgia. It is another E. paradoxa and E. purpurea cross which blooms from early summer and continues with sporadic flowering into fall. Proven Winner selection. Grows 24-36″ high by 18-24″. Zone 4.

echinaceapurpleemperor (300x296)Echinecea ‘Purple Emperor’ – This Coneflower bears absolutely lovely magenta-purple flowers which are accented by a brownish-orange cone. It is a member of the Butterfly Series that also features a compact growth habit and dense green foliage. The dried seedheads provide a winter seed source for finches and other wild birds. Grows 15-18″ high by 18-24″ wide. Zone 4.

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