A Vegetable Sampler

swisschardeldorado (300x298)Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla ‘Eldorado’ – A slow-bolting Swiss Chard with gorgeous bright golden-yellow stems. It can be eaten as baby greens in mixed salads after 30 days or cooked as a vegetable at maturity. ‘Eldorado’ has excellent frost tolerance and can be grown as a winter crop with minimal protection. 60 days to full maturity. Grows 16-18″ high by 10″ wide.

beanbluelake (299x300)Phaseolus vulgaris ‘Blue Lake Pole’ – A standard Pole Bean with generally straight stringless 6-7″ long green pods. These are easily grown vertically on poles or a trellis, making them a good choice for smaller vegetable gardens. Expect 4 to 6 crops on average (until they succumb to the frost), all of which are great for freezing or canning. Matures in 65 days. Grows 6-7′ high.

beangoldenwax (300x295)Phaseolus vulgaris ‘Golden Wax Bush’ – An heirloom bean (first introduced around 1871) known for its excellent yields of 5-6″ long golden-yellow stringless beans. These are great for freezing and canning, or for use in that summer classic, Three Bean Salad. Like most beans, it is more productive when planted with bacterial inoculant. Matures in 55-60 days. Grows 18-24″ high.

pepperfish (300x293)Capsicum annuum ‘Fish’ – A rare variegated African-American heirloom (predates the 1870’s) with beautiful green and white mottled foliage. It produces hot & spicy 2-3″ long striped peppers of green, yellow, orange, red or brown. This pepper is a prominent ingredient in Chesapeake seafood dishes, especially cream sauces. 80 days to maturity. Grows 18 to 24″ high.

cucmberlemon (288x300)Cucumis sativus ‘Lemon’ – A beautiful heirloom (late 1800’s) cucumber which lives up to its name by producing small rounded fruits (3-4″ long) that have a lemon yellow skin and sweet lime green flesh. The fruits are not too heavy so the vines can be trained vertically on a fence or trellis. It is also a good choice for cooler climates as it ripens quickly. Matures in 70 days. Grows 60″+.

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