Fragrant Shrubs II

syringabloomerang (292x300)Syringa BLOOMERANG ‘Dark Purple’ (syn. ‘SMSJBP7’) – A new addition to the BLOOMERANG Series with larger deep purple flowers in spring, with a repeat bloom from midsummer into autumn. It is a Proven Winners shrub and is taller than the earlier introductions. This cultivar is bred from S. patula, S. meyeri, S. macrophylla and S. juliana. Grows 4-6′ high and wide. Zone 3.

peony bartzella (299x300)Paeonia x ‘Bartzella’ – This Itoh Peony is a cross between herbaceous peonies and tree peonies – it features huge (9″ across) double to semi-double blooms of pale yellow from May to June. The flowers have a sweet lemon scent and often show a hint of scarlet in the center. Mature shrubs are capable of producing upwards of 80 blooms per season. Grows 3′ high and wide. Z3.

lavintermediagrosso (292x300)Lavandula x intermedia ‘Grosso’ – This French Lavadin or cross of Lavadula angustifolia and L. latifolia has tall spikes of highly fragrant purple blooms from July through to September. It is grown commercially for its fragrant dried flowers and essential oils. ‘Grosso’ is deer resistant and will definitely attract the butterflies to your garden. Grows 24-30″ tall by 24″. Zone 5.

viburnumcarlcephalum (281x300)Viburnum x carlcephalum – The Fragrant Snowball is a cross of two Viburnums, V. carlesii and V. macrocephalum f. keteleeri. The fragrant white flower clusters (up to 5″ across) emerge from pink buds from late spring into early summer. It is an RHS Award of Garden Merit winner and also features reddish-purple autumn foliage. Grows 6-10′ high and wide. Hardy to zone 6.

buddleiablackknight (290x300)Buddleia davidii ‘Black Knight’ (syn. Buddleja) – A standard Butterfly Bush with deep purplish-black cone-shaped terminal flowers that are borne from midsummer into autumn. The fragrant blooms are nicely contrasted by the greyish-green foliage held on arching branches. Deadheading promotes repeat flowering. Grows 8-10′ tall by 6-10′ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

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