David Austin’s English Roses IV

rosaladyofshalot (285x300)Rosa ‘Lady of Shalott’ (syn. ‘AUSnyson’) (seedling x seedling) – An intricate English rose as far as colouring is concerned with apricot and salmon-pink petals, backed in golden-yellow. It has an equally enticing scent with spicy apple and clove, balanced with tea fragrance. The buds are also a striking orange-red on this repeat blooming rose. Grows 4′ tall by 3-4′ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

rosamary (300x295)Rosa MARY ROSE (syn. ‘AUSmary’) (WIFE OF BATH x ‘The Miller’) – A standard among the English roses with large rose-pink flowers with loose petals that repeat throughout the summer. It has strong old rose fragrance with a hint of honey and makes a beautiful cut flower. Produced ‘Redoute’ and ‘Winchester Cathedral’ as sports. Grows 4-5′ tall by 3-5′ wide. Zone 5.

rosatess2 (296x300)Rosa TESS OF THE D’URBERVILLES (syn. ‘AUSmove’) (‘The Squire’ x seedling) – A beautiful dark crimson rose with deeply cupped flowers that will occasionally nod with their weight. These have a pleasant old rose fragrance that isn’t overpowering and it will grow 6-8′ tall with support. The shrub itself is quite prickly with mid-green foliage. Grows 4′ tall by 3.5′ wide. Zone 5.

rosaalnick (300x294)Rosa THE ALNWICK ROSE (syn. ‘AUSgrab’) (seedling x GOLDEN CELEBRATION) – The smaller blooms (averaging 2.75″) open a rich pink and fade with age, with a cupped form. The flowers are blessed with a strong old rose fragrance, with just a hint of raspberry. It repeat blooms throughout the summer over lush green foliage. Grows 4′ tall by 3′ wide. Hardy to zone 5.

rosacharlesdarwin (300x297)Rosa CHARLES DARWIN (syn. ‘AUSpeet’) (seedling x seedling) – A yellow to buff bloom which opens rounded at first and matures to a shallow cup form. These bear a strong lemon fragrance on warm days, with floral tea being prevalent on others. It is considered quite disease resistant with medium green foliage on nearly thornless stems. Grows 4′ tall by 3.5′ wide. Zone 5.

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