A Berry Sampler II

vacciniumblueberryglaze (299x300)Vaccinium BLUEBERRY GLAZE (syn. ‘ZF08-095′) – A hybrid blueberry which is part of the BrazelBerries series of compact berry bushes which can be grown in containers. It produces small, dark blue berries in midsummer with a strong wild blueberry flavour. The glossy green foliage shifts to deep burgundy in autumn. Grows 2-3’ tall and wide. Hardy to zone 5.

currantpink (296x300)Ribes rubrum ‘Pink Champagne’ – This cross of white and red currant features greenish-yellow spring blooms followed by pendulous clusters of blush pink berries in July. The fruit is not as sharp tasting as red currant, making them popular for fresh eating or jellies. ‘Pink Champagne’ can be trained into an edible hedge. Self-fertile. Grows 3-5′ tall by 4-5′ wide. Hardy to zone 3.

cherrynanking (295x300)Prunus tomentosa – The Nanking Cherry is a large bush form which doubles as an ornamental and a fruit producer. It bears abundant pink buds which open to snow white flowers, followed by sweet 1/2″ wide translucent red cherries. Nanking Cherry is very cold hardy and fast growing, although not always long lived. Grows 5′ tall by 5-6′ wide. Hardy to zone 2.

gooseberryred (300x300)Ribes uva-crispa ‘Hinnonmaki Red’ – A mildew resistant gooseberry which works well for coastal gardens, ‘Hinnonmaki Red’ features medium-sized red fruit with tangy skin and sweet flesh. This Finnish introduction generally crops in July and is slower growing than most gooseberries. Attracts beneficial insects. Self-fertile. Grows 3-4′ tall with pruning. Zone 3.

loganberry (300x295)Rubus x loganobaccus ‘American Thornless’ – The original Loganberry resulted as a cross of Blackberry ‘Aughinbaugh’ and Raspberry ‘Red Antwerp’, with the flavour being a balance of both parents. The thornless variety was developed in 1933 as a sport or mutation. It will require some support for the trailing canes, to keep the fruit off the ground. Grows 6-8′ long. Self-fertile. Z5.

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