Climbing Roses IV

rosaclimbingblossomtime (300x299)Rosa ‘Blossomtime’ (O’Neal 1951) (‘New Dawn’ x seedling) – A large flowered (3.5″ across) climber with strongly fragrant pink blooms with a slightly darker reverse. These are borne throughout the season in small clusters. ‘Blossomtime’ can be trained as a short climber or pillar rose with pruning. Mildew resistant. Good cut flower. Grows 10 to 15′ tall. Hardy to zone 5.

rosaclimbingblaze (300x296)Rosa ‘Blaze’ (syn. ‘Climbing Blaze’) (Kallay 1932) (‘Paul’s Scarlet Climber’ x ‘Gruss an Teplitz’) – An older climbing hybrid multiflora with 2.5″ wide scarlet blooms that are borne in small clusters and repeat well. These are produced over dark green leathery foliage which is somewhat prone to blackspot. Mildly fragrant. Grows to 15′ tall. Hardy to zone 6.

rosawhitedaw (300x297)Rosa WHITE DAWN (Longley 1949) (‘New Dawn’ x ‘Lily Pons’) – A heavy bloomer with Gardenia-like flowers that have a classic sweet rose fragrance. It repeats well and has dark green foliage. There is another German ‘White Dawn’ out there called ‘Weisse New Dawn’ which was discovered as a sport of ‘New Dawn’ in 1959. Grows 12 to 14′ tall. Hardy to zone 5.

rosaantique89 (283x300)Rosa ANTIQUE ’89 (syn. ‘Antique’, ‘KORdalen’) (Kordes & Sons 1988) ([‘Grand Hotel’ x ‘Sympathie’] x [seedling x ‘Arthur Bell’]) – A large flowering (4″ wide) climber with unusual ruffled blooms with a cream base and carmine-red edges. The flowers have minimal fragrance but the plant is quite disease resistant and cold hardy. Best in full sun. Grows 8 to 14′ tall. Hardy to zone 4.

rosaspiritoffreedom (299x300)Rosa ‘Spirit of Freedom’ (syn. ‘AUSbite’) (Austin 1988) (seedling x ‘AUScot’) – A short English rose climber with cupped soft pink blooms that fade to lilac-pink as they age. The flowers are fragrant and also repeat bloom – these are borne over attractive greyish-green foliage. ‘Spirit of Freedom’ can also be trained as a large shrub specimen. Grows 8′ tall as a climber. Hardy to zone 6.

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